Tupperware and Georgetown University join forces and prove that confidence boosts business

Wednesday, 1 March, 2017

For decades, Tupperware Brands has seen the economic impact of cultivating confidence among its workforce, a proven link between increased confidence and earning potential. Uniting with Georgetown University, Tupperware Brands sought to discover if positive confidence cycles had the same impact in the broader business world. 

 

The Hard Value of Soft Skills report, conducted in partnership with Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, found that confidence drives business and professional success and can be systematically cultivated among workers, regardless of geography. The two-year study surveyed 4,000 employed adults in Brazil, South Africa and the United States.

 

For years, I’ve seen firsthand the value of non-cognitive skills, like confidence and resilience, within our workforce,” said Rick Goings, Tupperware Brands Corporation Chairman and CEO. “These findings show that no matter where you work, confidence is good for business. It’s up to management to build a culture where employees are encouraged to learn and grow, and I encourage CEOs and business leaders to put these findings into practice and cultivate a more confident workforce, given its immense value”.

 

Workers who felt they had permission to fail reported increased confidence, increased productivity and an improved ability to overcome challenges.  

  • Workers’ confidence increases up to 30% when organizations treat failure as a signal of effort and not a lack of worker competence;
  • More confident workers are 45% more optimistic about their life and future;
  • More confident workers are 24% more likely to overcome challenges encountered a work.

Additionally, research shows that the link between confidence and success is universal, within Tupperware Brands and beyond, and across countries, gender, and enterprise types. The confidence-success link exists regardless of total work experience or experience in one’s current job, suggesting that confidence exists separately from on-the-job experience.

 

Survey Metholodogy

The research team was led by Tinsley, with collaboration from Jason Schloetzer, the William and Karen Sonneborn Term Associate Professor of Business Administration at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, and Matthew Cronin, associate professor of management at George Mason University School of Business.   The study was conducted in two phases, seeking to identify the tangible drivers of confidence, pinpoint the concrete economic impact of women’s confidence regardless of market or demographic and quantify the role that confidence plays in women’s economic empowerment. This research was conducted among 3,500 current Tupperware Sales Force members and 500 non-Tupperware affiliated, employed adults in Brazil, South Africa and the U.S..

 

For more information, please click here